Shorebreak

by Savannah Jade Firm arms wrapped around my body as we lay atop a dark green crocheted blanket in the sand. Each grain molded to the contours of our figures, leaving imprints in the shape of mini sand dunes. Past his shoulder where my chin rested, my fingertips grazed the peak of the nearest dune, tracing the curvature of Earth’s natural occurring memory foam. The sand trickled down, forming a small waterfall that shimmered like Read more…

Over 50 Pieces of Writing Advice from PTM & Guest Authors Summarized

The place of writing advice in a writer’s journey is like any other advice. It’s for you to take if it applies to you and if it may benefit you. Advice may also not apply to you at the moment and end up coming back around to you when it does fit. Advice given need not be taken either. It’s often best to only use the advice that resonates with you. One piece of writing Read more…

A Nightmare: PTM’s Horror

Our pulse quickens. Our eyes grow wide. We gasp for breath, shudder, and shrink back into our seats. Horror readers—and writers—are a true contradiction. As our favorite genre hurls us mercilessly into our deepest childhood frights, feeds us to monsters, and speeds us headlong into destruction and death, we’ve never felt more alive. What is it about wandering through words, away from the safety of the light, into the terrors of the darkness, through dizzy Read more…

The Little Clay Godling

by Meahgan Ferral In the dark of the woods, where sunbeams rarely kissed the ground and strangers never stepped, there was a small community, tucked away in the leaves and branches and dirt. I’ve lived my life there, in a cabin with my parents and sister. The two of us spent our childhood roaming beneath the trees with our parents at our heels, whispering in our ears to never wander too far, to never stray Read more…

 Macy’s Adventure

by Camryn Lehr I don’t remember the city where I was born. I was taken to this world of green before I could talk. At bedtime, I used to snuggle into my soft lime-printed blanket, and ask Grandfather to tell me of the city. He always sat in my blue desk chair, which made him look unusually large, and read from a worn, stained piece of paper. I’ve always wanted to read it, but the Read more…